Bakuchiol: The Retinol Alternative Gentle Enough For Sensitive Skin

Basic. Simple. Safe. If you saw these adjectives on a dating profile, you’d swipe left in a millisecond. Yet if you have sensitive skin, they probably sum up every product in your medicine cabinet. Exciting, you think, is for those with thicker hides. 

Anyone prone to irritation, and over the advanced age of 25, is familiar with the cautionary tale. You get all thirsty about the latest fountain-of-youth formula. The stuff seems trustworthy enough, might even sport an Allure Best of Beauty sticker or Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval. So you grab for your credit card, then religiously slather the potion on your skin—until, that is, it becomes red and starts peeling.

C’mon, tell the truth: How many hundreds of dollars’ worth of creams and serums have you given away or left to gather dust in a drawer? 

The problem is that the most popular weapon in the cosmetics industry’s age-defying arsenal is also the one most likely to wreak havoc. Yes, retinol is clinically proven to reduce fine lines and wrinkles, minimize pores, and improve skin’s texture and tone. But there’s a reason it comes with a warning to avoid sunlight. The powerful Vitamin-A derivative works by damaging the skin’s outer layer just enough to encourage cell turnover, a process that leaves the epidermis open to external danger.

Well, guess what, sensitive souls? There’s a kinder, gentler wrinkle-reducer now appearing on the scene. And though safe, the retinol-alternative bakuchiol is far from basic. (Just try saying the word; even after you learn that it’s pronounced ba-koo-chee-ol, your mouth may refuse to make the right sounds.) Derived from the plant Psoralea corylifolia, commonly called “babchi,” bakuchiol has been a staple of Eastern medicine for centuries, used to treat a host of maladies. It wasn’t until 2018, however, that a double-blind scientific study pitted the ingredient against retinol and found bakuchiol both equally effective and four times less likely to cause a reaction. Makes sense, given the plant’s anti-inflammatory properties.

Of course, we totally get it if you remain wary (see “hundreds of dollars” and “given away,” above). Which is why Beekman 1802 allows you to control the amount of this active ingredient in your daily skincare routine. The foundation of that routine: our Clinically KindTM Bloom Cream, formulated with soothing goat milk—NOT sulfates, phthalates, parabens, colorants, or fragrances—and packed with probiotics that feed the skin’s natural biome, like yogurt does for gut health. You choose when to add an age-defying boost to the Bloom Cream by incorporating our bakuchiol-based Dream Booster, and you dictate that boost’s potency. Simply follow the three steps below.

1. Press down once on the Bloom Cream container to “bloom” one serving of the probiotic moisturizer. 

2. Add a drop or two (your choice) of the Dream Booster* to the center of the “bloom.”

3. Swirl and mix together to encapsulate the active ingredient, then apply evenly to your face.

*If it’s a brighter, more even-toned complexion you’re after, swap in our Golden Booster, powered by the Vitamin C-rich amla berry. Want extra moisture? Add our Milk Drops Ceramide Serum instead.   

That’s right, you’re in control here. And we know better than to try and sell you on a one-size-fits-all solution. Because while scientists have determined that bakuchiol safely and gently smooths skin’s texture, minimizes pores, and diminishes fine lines and wrinkles, the real expert on sensitive skin is always the person living inside it.