The remaining flats from SUNY Cobleskill.
The remaining flats from SUNY Cobleskill.

Early last spring you might remember us posting about how the wonderful students of SUNY Cobleskill’s Plant Science Department helped us start some of the seeds for the Beekman 1802 Heirloom Vegetable Garden under the kind and watchful eye of Bob Sutherland, the SUNY Cobleskill Floriculture Instructor and Greenhouse Manager.

Well, this past weekend, we picked up the remaining flats of their labors, and put the finishing touches on the garden. (Or at least the finishing touches of the first round of planting.) We can’t thank them enough for their skillful assistance. Since we don’t yet have greenhouses at The Beekman (wishlist item #45,324) there would be no other way for us to start the rare heirloom varieties we seek to showcase.

Soon it will be green as far as the eye can see.
Soon it will be green as far as the eye can see.

Our first garden tourist inadvertantly hitched a ride all the way from Bob Sutherland’s home, where we picked up the flats, to the Beekman Garden. We immediately named him the garden’s “Chief Pest Controller.” Perhaps we can enter our June Garden Party Contest with him.

A visiting professor.
A visiting professor.

All of the plants are now in, and minus a small few lost to frost (in June!) they’re thriving perfectly. Upstanding and strong, they’re a perfect reflection of the students that helped us:

by Josh Kilmer-Purcell

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Phyllis

Raised beds may well help me to garden at all. My back yard is concrete-hard mud, cannot get a shovel into the dirt at all. My son cannot either and he lifts weights. We are considering 1} giving up, 2} buying veggies from the local organic growers or 3)throwing dynamite out there. But I think they would ask me to move, and I would be on the nightly news. Right now I SWEEP my back yard. Raised beds would help for sure.

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Linda

The raised beds look great! I love the idea of the bent wire frames on top! You know, if you grew some white climbing flowers on one, it would look like a Conestoga wagon……..lol

I used a flat version last year-a piece of chicken wire that the tomatoes grew through. The fruit was supported by the wire, clean and disease free, and the shade underneath was a great place for lettuce, as you suggested with yours. I think I'll try the Beekman type this time!

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