Beekman1802.com http://beekman1802.com The fastest growing lifestyle brand in America Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:00:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.3 Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/28469/ http://beekman1802.com/28469/#comments Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:00:06 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=28469 table-number-5-wood

The Summer Table

One of the simplest pleasures of summer is dining outdoors. It can be as easy as plucking a tomato from the vine in the vegetable garden and popping it straight into your mouth or as elaborate as a dinner for 30 in the garden. The mere act of eating under the canopy of a summer sky is a privilege for those of us who must endure six months of winter. Those fleeting months of summer bounty should be celebrated outside. Below are five table settings that epitomize this celebratory outdoor theme. Some are grand, some are simple but all seem to invite us to sit down under the sky to enjoy the company of friends and family and appreciate everything this outdoor season has to offer.

 

outdoor table five

 

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Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-49/ http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-49/#comments Wed, 15 Jul 2015 16:41:28 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=28461 d19902528d21bcf06fa43ccfc4e89cf1

Art From Above

Jim Denevan – artist, surfer, chef – has had a lifelong love affair with the land. Best known for his colossal land art, some of which can be seen below, Jim is also the founder and organizer of a worldwide initiative called Outstanding in The Field, which connects diners to the land and farms where their food is grown. His land art is utterly mesmerizing, usually requiring a bird’s eye view to fully appreciate its scale and geometrical precision. Jim uses natural materials – and often the land itself – to create spectacular patterns on sand, ice and grasslands. His tools are rudimentary at best (a rake, a shovel, a truck) but the end result is an elegant but temporary imprint on the land he so loves. Visit jimdenevan.com to see more of his work and learn about his other projects.

 

jim-denevan-five

 

Outstanding in the Field is coming to Beekman 1802 Farm on Aug 20, 2015!

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Sarah Monteiro grew up in a small coastal town on Long Island with an endless ocean, but with limited land and very few farms. The closest she came to agriculture was in her grandmother’s garden, or exploring cranberry bogs and picking wild blueberries. She was introduced to farming about 9 years ago and has have been weeding carrots, thinning beets, making flower bouquets and packing CSA boxes ever since.

But this year she took a big step!

She moved to just outside of Sharon Springs, NY, to start her new farm, and we are so thrilled not only to have this great new neighbor but also to offer her fresh bouquets each weekend in the flagship Mercantile on Main Street.

Farmhand Flowers is situated on 11 acres on a farm tucked in the hills between the Catskills and Adirondacks. Although Farmhand’s main focus is growing beautiful flowers, they also grow smaller amounts of herbs and vegetables. All of the crops are managed without the use of chemicals or pesticides from seed to post-harvest care. They believe that flowers deserve a place in our lives and don’t need to be reserved for only special occasions.

Learn more about Farmhand Flowers by visiting their website.  Click here

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Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-48/ http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-48/#comments Wed, 08 Jul 2015 10:28:57 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=28432 Screen Shot 2015-07-08 at 6.24.25 AM

 

The Falling Garden

In 2003, for the 50th Venice biennial, Swiss artists Gerda Steiner and Jorg Lenslinger installed a spectacular ‘garden’ at San Stae Church. The 17th-century building played host to a cascade of thousands of preserved blossoms and branches suspended from the ceiling. The collection of botanical tokens was an assembly of specimens from around the world: baobab seeds from Australia, beech, elder and magnolia branches from Switzerland, silk buds from Sweden, celery roots from Canada, seaweed from South Korea and berries from India. To view the installation, visitors were invited to lie on a large circular mat to gaze up at the botanical constellation. It’s the stuff that dreams are made of! Click here to visit the artists’ website.

 

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That Time of Year http://beekman1802.com/that-time-of-year/ http://beekman1802.com/that-time-of-year/#comments Sun, 05 Jul 2015 13:45:43 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=28428 There are many lessons that we learn from life on Beekman 1802 farm, but the first and perhaps the most important is to make hay while the sun shines.

This proverb is first recorded in John Heywood’s A dialogue conteinyng the nomber in effect of all the prouerbes in the Englishe tongue published in the year 1546:

Whan the sunne shinth make hay. Whiche is to say.
Take time whan time cometh, lest time steale away.

Medieval farmers would have been known this well.

Modern machinery and weather forecasting make haymaking more of a science, but Tudor farmers would have taken several days to cut, dry and gather their hay and would have had only folk rhymes like red sky at night to guide them. Forecasting the weather two or three days in advance wouldn’t have been possible, so all the more reason for them to ‘make hay while the sun shined’.

But making the most of sunny skies was about more than a desire to not get your woolens wet.

Wet hay favors the growth of organisms which generate heat and can increase hay temperatures up to 150 degrees F. Once hay heats beyond this point, chemical reactions take over and can increase temperatures to the point of spontaneous combustion. With “wet” hay packed tightly in bales and stacked together in large quantities, fires are very possible. Hay starts to burn depending mostly on the size of the stack and the material surrounding it.  Many old barns burns to the ground each year because the hay in the loft was put up wet.

If hay is stacked loose and sufficient cooling occurs at the same rate as the heat is generated, the hay may simply caramelize and turn brown or mold.  Moldy hay loses nutrients and may also cause bloat in the animals that consume it leading to less milk production.

Lesson learned.

We’re sharing these photos from America’s agrarian past as a reminder to get your chores done first.  You can’t roll in the hay until you’re done making it.

 

 

 

Last year, we were named to the Board of Trustees of the Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, NY.  The mission of the museum is to cultivate an understanding of the rural heritage that has shaped our land, communities and American culture.

One of our favorite collections of the museum is the vast photo archive.

Plowline: Images of Rural New York is a collecting initiative. The Farmers’ Museum, with the generous support of the Gipson Family, is actively assembling original photography that documents changes in agricultural practice, rural life and farming families in New York State from the 19th century through the present.

Each week on Beekman 1802 we’ll highlight a photo from the collection that not only depicts where WE come from but where we ALL come from.

 

To learn more about the museum or plan a visit on your next trip to Sharon Springs, click here

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We Want One! http://beekman1802.com/we-want-one/ http://beekman1802.com/we-want-one/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 22:17:54 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=28395  

 

Screen Shot 2015-07-01 at 6.13.46 PM

c. 1913 Portrait of a little girl in a goat cart. On the bottom of the print is written LILY COLE- MARION.

 

 

Last year, we were named to the Board of Trustees of the Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, NY.  The mission of the museum is to cultivate an understanding of the rural heritage that has shaped our land, communities and American culture.

One of our favorite collections of the museum is the vast photo archive.

Plowline: Images of Rural New York is a collecting initiative. The Farmers’ Museum, with the generous support of the Gipson Family, is actively assembling original photography that documents changes in agricultural practice, rural life and farming families in New York State from the 19th century through the present.

Each week on Beekman 1802 we’ll highlight a photo from the collection that not only depicts where WE come from but where we ALL come from.

 

To learn more about the museum or plan a visit on your next trip to Sharon Springs, click here

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Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/28387/ http://beekman1802.com/28387/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 15:56:24 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=28387 Screen Shot 2015-06-10 at 7.13.20 AM

 

The Human Canvas

Emma Fay is a British artist who uses the human body as her canvas. Working worldwide, she specializes in body artistry with a bespoke approach, tailored to the individuals whose bodies she is painting and to her clients. Rendering her skills for use in promotions, marketing, editorials, photography, performance, film and television has vastly expanded her portfolio and her travel opportunities, but her studios are based in the U.K. I was astounded by her work. In the five images below it is almost impossible to detect the human figures upon which this series of animals is painted. Look closely!
Click here to visit her website.

 

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Heirloom Seeds http://beekman1802.com/heirloom-seeds/ http://beekman1802.com/heirloom-seeds/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 00:29:35 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=28365  

We love discovering new artisans in upstate NY and bringing them into the Beekman 1802 Rural Artist Collective.

Through autumn we are displaying the work of “Horticulture Ceramicist” Michelle Corbett.

 

In Michelle’s words:

My work is about the celebration of nature and an attempt to embrace her qualities of seduction,
wonderment, and mystery. I am not interested in imitating nature, rather I am interested in
understanding the universal truths and the principles used in nature to recreate my own landscapes, my
own gardens, my own soil.

 
I think of my pieces as ceramic plants or seeds, things that nurture, have already nurtured or have the
potential to nurture. I am in a sense a ceramic horticulturalist. My goal is to cross-fertilize landscape
and gardens with ceramic forms.

In this series, “Sowing my Seeds” my sculptures are a personal reflection of my own harvest. These
seeds are a visual reminder to me to stay in the present moment….not to drift to the past and not let my
mind get hijacked into the future. Rather, by honoring the creative individual (John Galt), remaining in
a state of stillness…the result is radiant thought. It is here in that moment that nature reveals those
simple gifts of beauty that become my inspiration, my muse, and my joy.

 
I placed each seed pod on defunct agricultural gears from old farming equipment. Aesthetically, I love
the contrast between organic & industrial forms but furthermore the gears represent our relationship to
plants, the harvest and the tools that bring this abundance to us. In a sense the process that supports our
lives.

 
We all operate under the same laws of the universe, and we all carry within us an abundance of seeds to
cultivate. Each and everyone of us have seeds of joy, poverty, sorrow, integrity, creativity, success, and
failure etc. We choose which ones we will nurture and harvest. We all sow our own seeds and we are all
responsible for what we sow.

 
As a visual artist, I believe a voice does not have to be a sound from the mouth. A voice can be a
vibration for the eyes…like a powerful hum of many ocean waves…one after another until the shoreline
is changed.

 

 

 

See all the works of the B. 1802 Rural Artist Collective in the online Mercantile, click here

 

 

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Dinner with Havisham http://beekman1802.com/dinner-with-havisham/ http://beekman1802.com/dinner-with-havisham/#comments Wed, 24 Jun 2015 20:26:30 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=28354 The B. 1802 Rural Artisan Collective is the backbone of everything we do.  Even as our company has grown to produce products here, there, and everywhere, one of the driving missions of our expansion has always been and always will be raising the visibility of the many talented people we happily call our neighbors and who make the limited edition items that makes Beekman 1802 Mercantile one of the most famous retail destinations in upstate NY. It’s our way of trying to help as many people make a living doing what they love to do.

Hyde Hall is a historic manse inside Glimmerglass State Park, about a 15 minute drive from Beekman 1802.

Architectural Digest editor and Sharon Springs neighbor, Mitchell Owens, previously gave you a history and photo tour of Hyde Hall (click here)

For a fundraising event for the Hall, designers and merchants from upstate NY were asked to decorate a table.  Such a visible and prestigious event was a great opportunity to highlight the works of some of the members of the Collective.

Our original inspiration for the Beekman table was the documentary Grey Gardens, but after it all came together, it reminded us of a dinner with Ms. Havisham—a feast of great expectations and tarnished dreams.

Take a look at how it came together:

 

 

To learn more about Hyde Hall, click here

To see the work of our artisans visit our online Mercantile, click here

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The Gift of the Second Year http://beekman1802.com/the-gift-of-the-second-year/ http://beekman1802.com/the-gift-of-the-second-year/#comments Wed, 24 Jun 2015 18:25:33 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=28349 PF_ClothesLine_zps14a8ff6c

 

 

Cotton

 

We unfolded the 20-year old sheet from our bag

It smelled vaguely of Downy

But mostly of

Heat

On each corner we placed a shoe

We took off our shirts to feel the first bits of summer sun

 

In 10 minutes, the droplets of salty sweat formed on our upper lips

And our arms were slippery

And we closed our eyes from the brightness

And we may have both fallen asleep

 

 

And then we were awake

 

 

And then the faded and worn blue of your denim

And then blinding white

And then

Flesh

 

 

Brain spinning like a jenny

Feverish

 

The gift of the second year

Is cotton

 

Not because of the life threads we have just started to weave

Not because we are young and poor and can’t afford something else

Not because of anything

Except to remind us

That as the tedium

The complacency

The peacefulness

Of our lives together sets in

That it was not that long ago

That we were fumbling toward ecstasy

 

On a rumpled and damp cotton sheet

 

And that we found your left shoe about 10 feet away

 

 

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