Beekman1802.com http://beekman1802.com Goat Farmers of The Amazing Race Thu, 05 Mar 2015 02:14:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-33/ http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-33/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 19:15:51 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27806 number+5

Dioramaware

Helsinki-based artist Caroline Slotte is something of an excavator. Frequently using antique dinnerware and serveware as her canvas, she manipulates the objects by extracting and enhancing its subtle patterns and imperfections to create a layered, three-dimensional world that brings the pieces to life. For her series entitled “Layers Multiple”, Slotte collected examples of transferware (patterned china) and old dishes with imperfections in the glazes that revealed subtle, nondescript images. Using a variety of tools, Slotte then layers the dishes and carefully plans her approach to carving out its imagery. She sculpts the pieces to create a kind of diorama effect with one space leading into the space behind it and then fastens them together to create one piece. Below are five examples of her work from this series. To see more of Slotte’s work, please visit her website.

 

relief-china-5

 

 

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We’re Hooked! http://beekman1802.com/were-hooked/ http://beekman1802.com/were-hooked/#comments Sun, 01 Mar 2015 21:41:05 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27361 Beth Miller and Jennifer Cahill of Parris House Wool Works are not surprised when someone asks about their craft, “What IS that?  Are you weaving?  Is that really big needlepoint?”   They don’t mind, though, because the heritage craft of North American rug hooking is their passion.  Answering questions like these is part of their mission to spread awareness of the craft and get new generations of “hookers” making their own beautiful pieces.

Rug hooking became popular in New England and the Canadian Maritimes in the 19th century.  Many believe it was invented in that region, but it certainly became a common home craft in those areas because it offered a relatively easy and inexpensive way to cover bare floors in a cold climate.  Some rugs were hooked using reclaimed burlap from household sacks with wool strips cut from worn out clothing.  On the other hand, there were also refined rugs being hooked with materials sourced originally and specifically for the making of a rug.  Either way, this craft flourished and the resulting variety of styles, materials used, and techniques that developed remains astonishing.

Teaching the craft to new hookers, Beth and Jen encourage a spontaneously creative approach.  “If you can imagine it, you can hook it.”  They discourage a cookie cutter approach to the craft, eschew an overabundance of hard and fast rules, and promote a decidedly 21st century attitude toward keeping the craft alive while also revering its history and heritage.

The basic technique of rug hooking is very easy to learn, but the completion of a hooked piece is time consuming, with a great deal of color planning, often including hand dyeing of wool or other materials, careful shading, and sometimes trial and error involved on an initial  design.  The backing Beth and Jen use is high quality linen for heirloom durability, lasting a century or longer with good care, and the loops are pulled primarily with 100% wool strips.  Because of the varying availability of any specific wool at a given time, and the handmade process, each item they make is necessarily one of a kind, to a smaller or larger degree.  All finish stitching of bindings and pillow backs is done by hand.  Each item is made to order, as mass production is neither possible nor desired at Parris House Wool Works.  Beth and Jen take great care in making what they hope will become made-in-America family treasures that can be passed down for generations.

 
Beth and Jen hope that Parris House Wool Works’ exclusive line of herbal, warming, and decorative hooked pillows for Beekman 1802 will be a fun introduction to this sometimes unfamiliar American handcraft, and that they might even inspire you to get hooking yourself.

 

Take a look at what they’ve created for the Beekman 1802 Mercantile.  Click here

 

 

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Chicken or the Egg http://beekman1802.com/chicken-or-the-egg/ http://beekman1802.com/chicken-or-the-egg/#comments Wed, 25 Feb 2015 13:42:32 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27742 In the image, a young girl poses in a polka dot dress with a white collar. In front of her are three chickens. The young girl may be Myrtle Dezemo who would be approximately age 8. On the back of the photograph is written "1947." This image is part of a collection of photographs of the Dezemo family, owners of a dairy farm in Orange County, New York possibly in Walden, New York

In the image, a young girl poses in a polka dot dress with a white collar. In front of her are three chickens. The young girl may be Myrtle Dezemo who would be approximately age 8. On the back of the photograph is written “1947.” This image is part of a collection of photographs of the Dezemo family, owners of a dairy farm in Orange County, New York possibly in Walden, New York

 

Last year, we were named to the Board of Trustees of the Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, NY.  The mission of the museum is to cultivate an understanding of the rural heritage that has shaped our land, communities and American culture.

One of our favorite collections of the museum is the vast photo archive.

Plowline: Images of Rural New York is a collecting initiative. The Farmers’ Museum, with the generous support of the Gipson Family, is actively assembling original photography that documents changes in agricultural practice, rural life and farming families in New York State from the 19th century through the present.

Each week on Beekman 1802 we’ll highlight a photo from the collection that not only depicts where WE come from but where we ALL come from.

To learn more about the museum or plan a visit on your next trip to Sharon Springs, click here

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Kitchen Lost + Found http://beekman1802.com/kitchen-lost-found/ http://beekman1802.com/kitchen-lost-found/#comments Tue, 24 Feb 2015 20:57:48 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27732 Screen Shot 2015-02-24 at 2.04.14 PM

Named by The Associated Press as one of the “Best Books to Get You Thinking About Food.”

 The 18th century French epicure and gastronome, Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin once said, “Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are.

And we believe that to be true.  We love to see families that decide to spend time together in the kitchen or the dinner table and talking to people who value the food that goes into their bodies more than the other material things that surround them.

At Beekman 1802, we have a love for everything vintage.  As recent as 50 years ago, design was much more focused on practicality and usability than wit and aesthetics.  Given the whirring, beeping, fast-speed nature of modern society, pondering a vintage item seems to bring instant quiet and peace.

This is why we fell in love with Richard Snodgrass’ book, Kitchen Things (you can buy it by clicking here)

Richard tells stories about how the utensils we choose can define who we are, how we live, and how lovingly we share food our family and friends.  The stark photography and the storytelling make each item take on an unexpected emotional quality that clearly forms the links between the personality of the cook, the economic and cultural necessity of the times, and the influence of family tradition.

Richard kindly allowed us to present a small collection of photos from the book.  We hope you enjoy as much as we did.

 

 

 

About the Author

Richard Snodgrass lives in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with his wife Marty and two indomitable female tuxedo cats, raised from feral kittens, named Frankie and Becca.

His book of photographs and text on the Flight 93 Temporary Memorial, An Uncommon Field, was published by Carnegie Mellon University Press. His novel, There’s Something in the Back Yard, published originally by Viking Press in 1989, was recently reissued by Amazon’s CreateSpace and on Kindle.

For more information, go to www.rsnodgrass.com

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Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-32/ http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-32/#comments Tue, 24 Feb 2015 17:42:46 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27721 number 5 cookie cutter

Winter’s Titans

On days when the temperature plummets well below freezing, my mind often turns to the woodland creatures who must endure these frigid times without the benefit of shelter or manufactured heat. While they have evolved to survive a harsh winter climate, I still can’t help but feel a bit worried about them.

Among the world’s most amazing (and visually dazzling) creatures are those that have evolved to thrive in arctic conditions, animals that actually require the cold and the ice and the snow to survive. Below are five arctic animals that have always fascinated me. They are beautiful, powerful and rare.

Polar Bear: Despite their lovable appearance, polar bears are ferocious predators. They inhabit the regions surrounding the Arctic Sea and territories in northern Canada, Alaska and Greenland. Polar bears are born on land but spend much of their time in the sea, hunting for seals and fish. An adult polar bear can weigh as much as 1,600 lbs.

Arctic Fox: The Arctic Fox occupies much the same territory as the polar bear. It is found throughout northern Canada and northern Russia, hunting small prey, such as mice, voles, lemmings and seal pups.

Arctic Hare: With powerful legs and sharp claws, Arctic Hares make their homes by burrowing deep into the snow and tundra where they nest. They live in northern Canada and Greenland and can travel long distances. Their top speed is 40 miles per hour and they can easily outrun many of their predators, such as the Arctic Fox and the Snowy Owl.

Snowy Owl: This is one of the largest owl species in the world, found throughout Canada, the United States and Russia. Its powerful talons, thick plumage, 60-inch wingspan and excellent eyesight make it a perfect predator for its harsh winter environment. It feeds on mice, voles, hares and small birds.

Snow Leopard: This wild cat is native to the mountain regions of central Asia and is considered endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. Smaller and more stout than many of the world’s ‘’big cats’’ it is still a fierce hunter, able to withstand freezing temperatures with its thick coat.

 

Arctic animals five

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Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-31/ http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-31/#comments Wed, 18 Feb 2015 14:31:09 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27687 5

No Two Alike

Perspective is everything. When viewed from afar, fallen snow appears as a blanket of white across the landscape, either charming or frustrating us. We shovel its weighty chunks into ditches, shape it into sculptures on our front lawns or make playful weapons from it in the form of balls. It boggles the mind, then, that no two of the billions of snowflakes that make up this mass of frozen white precipitation is identical.

Wilson Bentley, a Vermont farmer, was the first person to ever photograph individual snowflakes. An amateur photographer and science enthusiast, Bentley endeavored to capture images of snowflakes beginning in 1885 after rigging up a microscope to a bellows camera. He isolated individual snowflakes by carefully placing them on a glass slide mounted against a black piece of cloth. The effect is stunning. He photographed more than 5000 snowflakes in his lifetime and no two are alike. What is even more astounding is the mathematical symmetry in each of the snowflakes. These are not just shapeless blobs falling from the sky; snowflakes are clusteres of tiny, finely crafted crystals clinging together as they fall to earth.

Bentley’s project became so successful that he published a book of his photographs in 1931 called Snow Crystals. Scientists were so assured of the accuracy of his photographic evidence that no one bothered to study snowflakes professionally for more than 100 years; Bentley’s work was so extensive and so meticulously archived that there was simply no need.

 
Below are five of Bentley’s photographs of snowflakes, taken between 1885 and 1900. The next time you catch a snowflake on your mitten, look closely: you may just discover a rare and icy gem that is never to be recreated.

 

bentley-snowflakes-five

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Winter Work Horse http://beekman1802.com/winter-work-horse/ http://beekman1802.com/winter-work-horse/#comments Sun, 15 Feb 2015 13:29:08 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27675  A team of horses poses with a large load of logs in the woods on a snowy day. Several men stand by or on top of the load.

A team of horses poses with a large load of logs in the woods on a snowy day. Several men stand by or on top of the load.

 

Last year, we were named to the Board of Trustees of the Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, NY.  The mission of the museum is to cultivate an understanding of the rural heritage that has shaped our land, communities and American culture.

One of our favorite collections of the museum is the vast photo archive.

Plowline: Images of Rural New York is a collecting initiative. The Farmers’ Museum, with the generous support of the Gipson Family, is actively assembling original photography that documents changes in agricultural practice, rural life and farming families in New York State from the 19th century through the present.

Each week on Beekman 1802 we’ll highlight a photo from the collection that not only depicts where WE come from but where we ALL come from.

To learn more about the museum or plan a visit on your next trip to Sharon Springs, click here

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A Trip Around http://beekman1802.com/a-trip-around/ http://beekman1802.com/a-trip-around/#comments Tue, 10 Feb 2015 18:17:37 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27614 Do you live a long, long way away from Sharon Springs, NY?  If so, we thought we’d give you a little tour around the flagship Beekman 1802 Mercantile courtesy of Pittsburgh-based photographer, Adam Millrinon

 

 

 

To shop at the Mercantile online, click here

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Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-30/ http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-30/#comments Tue, 10 Feb 2015 15:21:23 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27555 xoxo_valentine_party_flag_bunting_banner_5_postcard-rc3295048343f4abc944546c420d289bd_vgbaq_8byvr_324

Sweet Hearts

Even a quick glance through the pages of Martha Stewart Weddings will reveal the beauty of Wendy Kromer’s confectionery artwork. Those spectacular wedding cakes with tier after tier of elaborately-decorated cake layers were more than likely created by Wendy. She began working with Martha Stewart Living as a contributing editor in 1995 after winning the blue-ribbon prize at the Culinary Art Show in Manhattan. Martha was quick to sign her on as a regular contributor to her new weddings magazine and to employ her skills in other areas of her company: her catalogs, her television shows and her other magazines. In 2007 she co-wrote her first book with Martha: Martha Stewart’s Wedding Cakes.

Wendy studied her craft at the Peter Kump School of Culinary Art in New York City after a ten-year run as a fashion model in Paris. Over the last ten years, Wendy has become the standard-bearer for all culinary artists. Her work is unparallelled. In 2005, Wendy and her husband Scott Schell moved to Sandusky, Ohio, and opened Wendy Kromer Confections, a unique bakery & design studio located in historic downtown Sandusky. Wendy Kromer Confections reaches clients worldwide through Wendy’s continued work with Martha Stewart Living. While I am not a baker, I have always loved and admired Wendy’s work enormously. Below are five images of Wendy’s heart-shaped cookies for Valentine’s Day, made with astute attention to detail and so much love for her craft.

 

confection-five

 

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The Ice Age http://beekman1802.com/the-ice-age/ http://beekman1802.com/the-ice-age/#comments Sun, 08 Feb 2015 15:19:18 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27536 Image from 1958 of a man moving a block of ice with ice tongs at Millers Mills in West Winfield, NY located in Herkimer County. Three other blocks of ice are in view. On the bottom of the negative is written "Tranquille." The Ice Harvesting Festival takes place annually in Millers Mills even today.

Image from 1958 of a man moving a block of ice with ice tongs at Millers Mills in West Winfield, NY located in Herkimer County. Three other blocks of ice are in view. On the bottom of the negative is written “Tranquille.” The Ice Harvesting Festival takes place annually in Millers Mills even today.

See us participate in the ice harvest

Last year, we were named to the Board of Trustees of the Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, NY.  The mission of the museum is to cultivate an understanding of the rural heritage that has shaped our land, communities and American culture.

One of our favorite collections of the museum is the vast photo archive.

Plowline: Images of Rural New York is a collecting initiative. The Farmers’ Museum, with the generous support of the Gipson Family, is actively assembling original photography that documents changes in agricultural practice, rural life and farming families in New York State from the 19th century through the present.

Each week on Beekman 1802 we’ll highlight a photo from the collection that not only depicts where WE come from but where we ALL come from.

 

To learn more about the museum or plan a visit on your next trip to Sharon Springs, click here

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