Beekman1802.com http://beekman1802.com Goat Farmers of The Amazing Race Mon, 30 Mar 2015 12:11:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-36/ http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-36/#comments Wed, 25 Mar 2015 15:40:52 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27930 Screen Shot 2015-03-25 at 11.36.13 AM

Making a Splash

Photographers Jeremy Floto and Cassandra Warner, a husband-and-wife team based in New York, have an obsession with colour. From portraits to landscapes to more experimental projects, Floto and Warner always look on the bright side, bringing striking colour to their photographs with little or no digital enhancements. Their series “Colourant” features splashes of coloured liquids photographed in mid-air at a speed of 1/1300th of a second. The captured splashes, frozen in a moment of exuberance, appear like curious phantoms hovering over the landscape. Click here to see more of their amazing work.

 

colourant

 

 

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Rise and Shine http://beekman1802.com/rise-and-shine/ http://beekman1802.com/rise-and-shine/#comments Mon, 23 Mar 2015 11:47:59 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27926  Photographic negative. Image of woman at Lippett Farmstead taking a pan of gingerbread from the fireplace. Otsego County, New York


Photographic negative. Image of woman at Lippett Farmstead taking a pan of gingerbread from the fireplace. Otsego County, New York

 

Last year, we were named to the Board of Trustees of the Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, NY.  The mission of the museum is to cultivate an understanding of the rural heritage that has shaped our land, communities and American culture.

One of our favorite collections of the museum is the vast photo archive.

Plowline: Images of Rural New York is a collecting initiative. The Farmers’ Museum, with the generous support of the Gipson Family, is actively assembling original photography that documents changes in agricultural practice, rural life and farming families in New York State from the 19th century through the present.

Each week on Beekman 1802 we’ll highlight a photo from the collection that not only depicts where WE come from but where we ALL come from.

 

To learn more about the museum or plan a visit on your next trip to Sharon Springs, click here

 

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Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-35/ http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-35/#comments Thu, 19 Mar 2015 11:55:42 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27909 22493db0848d613adf4f275e03750334

Plant Concoctions

One of my favourite books is called The Plant Recipe Book, by Baylor Chapman. The premise of the book is simple: choose your favourite vessel (a copper pot, a serving bowl, a wooden crate), fill it with earth and plant it with bulbs and small houseplants to create a living arrangement for the indoors. The book contains 100 examples of these creations with instructions and tips on how to choose your plants, how to arrange them and how to keep them living for as long as possible.

“I think that people are surprised by how much you can fit into one bowl,” the author told the LA Times. “They are leery about adding too much to it. You can jam stuff in there like a floral arrangement. Succulents don’t mind being crowded. People tend to give them a lot of space. It’s not like a garden outside. The plants are not going to grow that much.”

Like flower arrangements, however, these living arrangements are ephemeral. Do not expect your plant concoctions to last a lifetime. Chapman’s remedy for this dilemma is simple: reuse and recycle. “Sometimes you can take succulents out of an arrangement and plant them outside,” she says. “Or separate them and plant one in a single container. An asparagus fern looks lovely by itself. Often you can make another arrangement from the plants.” Below are some examples of Chapman’s arrangements from the book. Using herbs, ferns, flowering bulbs, hellebores, succulents and wild flora, Chapman creates unique, long-lasting arrangements that would enliven any space.

 

five-plant-recipes

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Shopping with Ruth Reichl http://beekman1802.com/shopping-with-ruth-reichl/ http://beekman1802.com/shopping-with-ruth-reichl/#comments Sun, 15 Mar 2015 16:38:57 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27872

Ruth Reichl is the author of Delicious! a novel published by Random House in May 2014. She was Editor in Chief of Gourmet Magazine from 1999 to 2009.  Before that she was the restaurant critic of  both The New York Times(1993-1999) and the Los Angeles Times (1984-1993), where she was also named food editor. As co-owner of The Swallow Restaurant from 1974 to 1977, she played a part in the culinary revolution that took place in Berkeley, California. In the years that followed, she served as restaurant critic for New West and California magazines and has been awarded six James Beard awards.

She is also one of Josh’s idols.  Two of his favorite books of all time are her memoirs, Tender at the Bone, & Comfort Me with Apples.

We all recently crossed paths in Tucson, Arizona, and scoped out the Sunday Farmer’s Market together.  See what caught the eye of one of the most distinguished food lovers in America

 

 

 

 

Click here to see what Josh & Ruth agreed was one of the best food books of the last several years.

 

 

 

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Root to Leaf: Feta Spring Spread http://beekman1802.com/root-to-leaf-feta-spring-spread/ http://beekman1802.com/root-to-leaf-feta-spring-spread/#comments Sat, 14 Mar 2015 21:40:24 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27857 Screen Shot 2015-03-14 at 5.33.09 PM

 

“Seasonal cooking begins with the harvest,” says Satterfield in the introduction of ROOT TO LEAF. “And what I’ve come to learn is that there is little that changes so distinctly throughout the course of any year as the diverse world of fruits and vegetables.”

When we were in Atlanta recently we had the chance to sup at Miller Union, Steven Satterfield’s award-winning restaurant which has garnered him national attention as a chef who understands how to spotlight vegetables with a simple, elegant cooking style that honors the essence of the vegetable. Named the “Vegetable Shaman” by Sam Sifton in The New York Times, Satterfield describes his method of using the whole vegetable in the same way many butchers and chefs utilize a whole animal: root to leaf. This is not a vegetarian cookbook; it’s a cookbook about spotlighting fresh produce in the kitchen.

And if this world weren’t small enough, the stylist for Steven’s book, Thom Driver, was a former intern at Beekman 1802 Farm!

 

 

Feta Snack with Spring Radishes_ROOT TO LEAF

Though good with any fresh vegetable, this sharp, creamy feta dip, smoothed with a little buttermilk, is exceptional with crisp spring radishes. Much as in the combination above, salt and fat mellow any heat from the raw radishes. Cheesemaker Mary Rigdon of Decimal Place Farm has been bringing her goat’s milk feta to order to Miller Union since it opened. If you have a local farmers’ market that sells fresh cheeses,  look there first for good-quality feta.

 

Spring Feta Spread

 

8 ounces goat’s milk feta, preferably in brine

¼ to ½ cup buttermilk

½ teaspoon flaky sea salt

½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Extra virgin olive oil for finishing

Radishes and other vegetables for dipping

 

In a medium bowl, crumble the feta. With a rigid whisk, smooth out the feta first, then add buttermilk 1 tablespoon at a time until the mixture is smooth and the con- sistency of a creamy dip. Spoon the mixture into a small serving bowl and top with flaky sea salt, black pepper, and olive oil. Serve with raw radishes or other crudités.

Click here to get a copy of Steven’s stunning new book!

 

 

 

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Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-34/ http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-34/#comments Tue, 10 Mar 2015 00:18:23 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27845 670px-Numbers-Tally-Marks-Step-5

A Sharpened Focus

I truly cannot imagine the patience, focus and concentration required to carve sculptures from the lead of a pencil tip. Russian artist Salvat Fidai, however, seems to relish the practice and delivers astoundingly detailed results. The painter and sculptor, who lives in Ufa, Russia, is a traditional painter most of the time (oil on canvas) but enjoys the occasional fling with oddity: painting the characters of Breaking Bad on dried pumpkin seeds, for example, or, as shown in the photos below, carving faces, hands and other images into the very pencil tips he uses to sketch. I’m always amazed by such measured skill. Click here to visit the artist’s Etsy page.

 

pencils-carved

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Five Beautiful Things http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-33/ http://beekman1802.com/five-beautiful-things-33/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 19:15:51 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27806 number+5

Dioramaware

Helsinki-based artist Caroline Slotte is something of an excavator. Frequently using antique dinnerware and serveware as her canvas, she manipulates the objects by extracting and enhancing its subtle patterns and imperfections to create a layered, three-dimensional world that brings the pieces to life. For her series entitled “Layers Multiple”, Slotte collected examples of transferware (patterned china) and old dishes with imperfections in the glazes that revealed subtle, nondescript images. Using a variety of tools, Slotte then layers the dishes and carefully plans her approach to carving out its imagery. She sculpts the pieces to create a kind of diorama effect with one space leading into the space behind it and then fastens them together to create one piece. Below are five examples of her work from this series. To see more of Slotte’s work, please visit her website.

 

relief-china-5

 

 

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We’re Hooked! http://beekman1802.com/were-hooked/ http://beekman1802.com/were-hooked/#comments Sun, 01 Mar 2015 21:41:05 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27361 Beth Miller and Jennifer Cahill of Parris House Wool Works are not surprised when someone asks about their craft, “What IS that?  Are you weaving?  Is that really big needlepoint?”   They don’t mind, though, because the heritage craft of North American rug hooking is their passion.  Answering questions like these is part of their mission to spread awareness of the craft and get new generations of “hookers” making their own beautiful pieces.

Rug hooking became popular in New England and the Canadian Maritimes in the 19th century.  Many believe it was invented in that region, but it certainly became a common home craft in those areas because it offered a relatively easy and inexpensive way to cover bare floors in a cold climate.  Some rugs were hooked using reclaimed burlap from household sacks with wool strips cut from worn out clothing.  On the other hand, there were also refined rugs being hooked with materials sourced originally and specifically for the making of a rug.  Either way, this craft flourished and the resulting variety of styles, materials used, and techniques that developed remains astonishing.

Teaching the craft to new hookers, Beth and Jen encourage a spontaneously creative approach.  “If you can imagine it, you can hook it.”  They discourage a cookie cutter approach to the craft, eschew an overabundance of hard and fast rules, and promote a decidedly 21st century attitude toward keeping the craft alive while also revering its history and heritage.

The basic technique of rug hooking is very easy to learn, but the completion of a hooked piece is time consuming, with a great deal of color planning, often including hand dyeing of wool or other materials, careful shading, and sometimes trial and error involved on an initial  design.  The backing Beth and Jen use is high quality linen for heirloom durability, lasting a century or longer with good care, and the loops are pulled primarily with 100% wool strips.  Because of the varying availability of any specific wool at a given time, and the handmade process, each item they make is necessarily one of a kind, to a smaller or larger degree.  All finish stitching of bindings and pillow backs is done by hand.  Each item is made to order, as mass production is neither possible nor desired at Parris House Wool Works.  Beth and Jen take great care in making what they hope will become made-in-America family treasures that can be passed down for generations.

 
Beth and Jen hope that Parris House Wool Works’ exclusive line of herbal, warming, and decorative hooked pillows for Beekman 1802 will be a fun introduction to this sometimes unfamiliar American handcraft, and that they might even inspire you to get hooking yourself.

 

Take a look at what they’ve created for the Beekman 1802 Mercantile.  Click here

 

 

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Chicken or the Egg http://beekman1802.com/chicken-or-the-egg/ http://beekman1802.com/chicken-or-the-egg/#comments Wed, 25 Feb 2015 13:42:32 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27742 In the image, a young girl poses in a polka dot dress with a white collar. In front of her are three chickens. The young girl may be Myrtle Dezemo who would be approximately age 8. On the back of the photograph is written "1947." This image is part of a collection of photographs of the Dezemo family, owners of a dairy farm in Orange County, New York possibly in Walden, New York

In the image, a young girl poses in a polka dot dress with a white collar. In front of her are three chickens. The young girl may be Myrtle Dezemo who would be approximately age 8. On the back of the photograph is written “1947.” This image is part of a collection of photographs of the Dezemo family, owners of a dairy farm in Orange County, New York possibly in Walden, New York

 

Last year, we were named to the Board of Trustees of the Farmers’ Museum in Cooperstown, NY.  The mission of the museum is to cultivate an understanding of the rural heritage that has shaped our land, communities and American culture.

One of our favorite collections of the museum is the vast photo archive.

Plowline: Images of Rural New York is a collecting initiative. The Farmers’ Museum, with the generous support of the Gipson Family, is actively assembling original photography that documents changes in agricultural practice, rural life and farming families in New York State from the 19th century through the present.

Each week on Beekman 1802 we’ll highlight a photo from the collection that not only depicts where WE come from but where we ALL come from.

To learn more about the museum or plan a visit on your next trip to Sharon Springs, click here

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Kitchen Lost + Found http://beekman1802.com/kitchen-lost-found/ http://beekman1802.com/kitchen-lost-found/#comments Tue, 24 Feb 2015 20:57:48 +0000 http://beekman1802.com/?p=27732 Screen Shot 2015-02-24 at 2.04.14 PM

Named by The Associated Press as one of the “Best Books to Get You Thinking About Food.”

 The 18th century French epicure and gastronome, Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin once said, “Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are.

And we believe that to be true.  We love to see families that decide to spend time together in the kitchen or the dinner table and talking to people who value the food that goes into their bodies more than the other material things that surround them.

At Beekman 1802, we have a love for everything vintage.  As recent as 50 years ago, design was much more focused on practicality and usability than wit and aesthetics.  Given the whirring, beeping, fast-speed nature of modern society, pondering a vintage item seems to bring instant quiet and peace.

This is why we fell in love with Richard Snodgrass’ book, Kitchen Things (you can buy it by clicking here)

Richard tells stories about how the utensils we choose can define who we are, how we live, and how lovingly we share food our family and friends.  The stark photography and the storytelling make each item take on an unexpected emotional quality that clearly forms the links between the personality of the cook, the economic and cultural necessity of the times, and the influence of family tradition.

Richard kindly allowed us to present a small collection of photos from the book.  We hope you enjoy as much as we did.

 

 

 

About the Author

Richard Snodgrass lives in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with his wife Marty and two indomitable female tuxedo cats, raised from feral kittens, named Frankie and Becca.

His book of photographs and text on the Flight 93 Temporary Memorial, An Uncommon Field, was published by Carnegie Mellon University Press. His novel, There’s Something in the Back Yard, published originally by Viking Press in 1989, was recently reissued by Amazon’s CreateSpace and on Kindle.

For more information, go to www.rsnodgrass.com

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